Change, by Damon Centola

Why I read it I had a wonderful day at ResearchEd Surrey in October. I caught up with old colleagues from Farnham Heath End, Weydon, and beyond, met new colleagues from Twitter, and attended some enlightening talks. I even navigated Jade Pearce’s PowerPoint in her excellent session on evidence-informed teaching. Adam Robbins’ talk on behaviouralContinue reading “Change, by Damon Centola”

Team Genius, by Rich Karlgaard and Michael Malone

Why I read it I really enjoy leading teams and being part of teams. All of us have interacted within a group, be it at school, work, or in an activity such as a sports team. We’ve all been in some unhealthy, unproductive teams. And, hopefully, we’ve experienced the opposite, too. I’ve always been fascinatedContinue reading “Team Genius, by Rich Karlgaard and Michael Malone”

Essentialism, by Greg McKeown

Why I read it I follow many people on Twitter who have enjoyed similar books to my favourites: Think Again by Adam Grant, or Atomic Habits by James Clear, for example. What they seem to share unanimously is raving positivity about Essentialism, by Greg McKeown. I’ve read some excellent reviews and summaries of the bookContinue reading “Essentialism, by Greg McKeown”

The Extended Mind, by Annie Murphy Paul

Why I read it  My education hero, and fellow Crystal Palace fan, Doug Lemov, tweeted that the excellent Annie Murphy Paul was looking for people to read her book in its run up to publication. A combination of Doug’s recommendation, plus the fascinating subject matter of the book, made this an easy decision, and AnnieContinue reading “The Extended Mind, by Annie Murphy Paul”

Noise, by Daniel Kahneman, Olivier Sibony, and Cass Sunstein

Why I read it  I really enjoyed Thinking, Fast and Slow, and having listened to Kahneman talk about his more recent work on a string of podcasts, I was excited to pre-order Noise. I knew that Kahneman and his team would be considered, detailed, and base their work on a large volume of research, andContinue reading “Noise, by Daniel Kahneman, Olivier Sibony, and Cass Sunstein”

Seven and a Half Lessons About The Brain, by Lisa Feldman Barrett

Why I read it: If you’re here, you may have read books about memory science, metacognition, and how we learn things. Research and books on those areas have informed my teaching for the last five years, so I thought it was time to try one that looks at the brain beyond learning and teaching. InContinue reading “Seven and a Half Lessons About The Brain, by Lisa Feldman Barrett”

Think Again, by Adam Grant

Why I read it: I enjoy reading books about psychology and behaviour, so that I can understand the mind better, and then try to transfer some of that learning to my professional and personal life. I’d heard Adam Grant speak at various events and on podcasts, and like his personable and articulate style, coupled withContinue reading “Think Again, by Adam Grant”

Positive Psychology in a Nutshell, by Ilona Boniwell

Why I read it  My aim this year (and beyond) is to broaden my reading and to plough energy into what I can do as a person and leader to better understand what motivates people and helps them to thrive. Everything is on the table, and when I saw this book was recommended by someContinue reading “Positive Psychology in a Nutshell, by Ilona Boniwell”